"All who met him had immediate recognition of a
powerful personality and natural dignity. He owed
this strong growth of character to its rooting
in the house of a chieftain. Yet his elder brothers
with equal opportunity had no equal vigor and ability. ..."
-- W. H. Murray, biographer
Born: at Loch Katrine, February 1670

Rob Roy MacGregor by W. H. Murray

Murray's biography of Rob Roy MacGregor is detailed, colorful, and interesting. Interspersing available documented evidence with what must be informed conjecture about the life and times of Rob Roy's Scottish Highlands, Murray develops a story that is as entertaining as it is educational. Rob Roy MacGregor is available through Amazon booksellers online.

Murray describes Rob Roy's character:

ďAll who met him had immediate recognition of a powerful personality and natural dignity. He owed this strong growth of character to its rooting in the house of a chieftain. Yet his elder brothers with equal opportunity had no equal vigor and ability. His alone was the latent potential, to which strong development was given by the good chance of birth and parents. He gained thus a dozen advantages: formal education apart, he heard from early days a higher level of discussion on the clanís affairs, learned tact and diplomacy in dealing with men and women; developed a natural courtesy; learned to accept responsibility for the affairs of tenants, and to have real concern for their welfare, on which his own depended; learned concern for stock and wildlife, on which people relied for livelihood and supplies; developed close observation, far beyond what is now thought needful, of all wild things and of menís living conditions; received discipline, for the chieftainís family had to set higher standards of behavior; acquired the habit of foresight in farming and politics; won powers of command; and had the chance given by wide travel to know his country and its people, establishing thus personal relations with clan chiefs and merchants and a rich variety of men.

ďAbove all, he had a settled home and a happy one throughout childhood, and again during many years after early marriage. He naturally developed a deep love of the Trossachs and Loch Lomond homelands, with a complete knowledge of how to live there in bad times. The loss and starvation and misery that he and his families had experienced during the famine years sharpened his regard for the poor. His well-attested compassion towards them had this double base in a good home and personal suffering.Ē

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